Laundry Soap – homemade

Laundry Soap – homemade

Homemade Liquid Laundry Soap- Front or top load machine

1 Liter (4 cups) – hot tap water
1 soap bar – I used Irish Spring because I got 3/$1
250 ml (1 cup) – Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda* I could not find this anywhere.  The active ingredient is sodium carbonate so I read the back of the boxes in the laundry isle and discovered that the powdered Clorox 2 would do the trick.  The box was $7 and at the rate I am using the detergent, should last 3-4 years.
125 ml (½ Cup) Borax $4

– Grate bar of soap and add to saucepan with water. Stir continually over medium-low heat until soap dissolves and is melted.

-Fill a 20 liter (5 gallon) bucket half full of hot tap water. Add melted soap, washing soda and Borax. Stir well until all powder is dissolved. Fill bucket to top with more hot water. Stir, cover and let sit overnight to thicken.

-Stir and fill a used, clean, laundry soap dispenser half full with soap and then fill rest of way with water. Shake before each use. (will gel)***

I used a 40 liter (10 gallon) bucket and skipped the soap dispensers.  My utility sink is next to my washer and it fits in there perfectly with room to spare.  I rarely use that sink so it maximizes storage and if I ever need it, I can lift the bucket out (or get my wonderful husband to lift it).  I sit the lid on top of the bucket with the scoop on top of that.  This keeps everything at the ready and little hands and paws out.

-Optional: You can add 10-15 drops of essential oil per 8 liters (2 gallons): add once soap has cooled.

Ideas: lavender, rosemary, tea tree oil.

-Yield: Liquid soap recipe makes 40 liters (10 gallons).

-Top Load Machine- 200 ml (5/8 Cup) per load (Approx. 180 loads)

-Front Load Machines- 60 ml (¼ Cup) per load (Approx. 640 loads)

*Arm & Hammer “Super Washing Soda” – in some stores or may be purchased online here (at Meijer.com). Baking Soda will not work, nor will Arm & Hammer Detergent – It must be sodium carbonate!!

•Works well in traditional or HE machines.

•Low sudsing. It is the ingredients in the soap, not the suds, that does the cleaning.

•Clumping and gelling of the detergent is normal. Stir before putting in dispenser, and shake before each use.

 

I get approximately six months worth of soap and so that means:

1 + 7 + 4 = $12 to buy the supplies and I have enough leftovers to make it again probably six more times (+ another three pack of soap).

That means $13 = less than $2 for 6 months of laundry soap!

 

There are seven in my family so the results will vary depending on your family’s size, but I doubt you’ll find a better deal in stores!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *